Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank - Hockenberry

Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank – Hockenberry

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Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank – Hockenberry
What: TEST BANK
ISBN: 0323069126
Year Published: 2010
Authors: Hockenberry
Edition: 9th

Product Description

Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank – Hockenberry

 

Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank – Hockenberry

 

Sample

Hockenberry: Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children, 9th Edition

 

Chapter 17: Health Promotion of the School-Age Child and Family

 

Test Bank

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. Which of the following statements accurately describes physical development during the school-age years?
a. Child’s weight almost triples.
b. Muscles become functionally mature.
c. Boys and girls double strength and physical capabilities.
d. Fat gradually increases, which contributes to child’s heavier appearance.

 

 

ANS:  C

Boys and girls double both strength and physical capabilities. Their consistent refinement in coordination increases their poise and skill. In middle childhood, growth in height and weight occurs at a slower pace. Between the ages of 6 and 12 years, children grow 5 cm/yr and gain 3 kg/yr. Their weight will almost double. Although the strength increases, muscles are still functionally immature when compared with those of adolescents. This age-group is more easily injured by overuse. Children take on a slimmer look with longer legs in middle childhood.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 645

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The parents of 9-year-old twin children tell the nurse, “They have filled up their bedroom with collections of rocks, shells, stamps, and bird nests.” The nurse should recognize that this is which of the following?
a. Indicative of giftedness
b. Indicative of typical twin behavior
c. Characteristic of cognitive development at this age
d. Characteristic of psychosocial development at this age

 

 

ANS:  C

Classification skills involve the ability to group objects according to the attributes they have in common. School-age children can place things in a sensible and logical order, group and sort, and hold a concept in their mind while they make decisions based on that concept. Individuals who are not twins engage in classification at this age. Psychosocial behavior at this age is described according to Erikson’s stage of industry versus inferiority.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 650

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following statements characterizes moral development in the older school-age child?
a. Rule violations are viewed in an isolated context.
b. Judgments and rules become more absolute and authoritarian.
c. The child has knowledge of the rules, but cannot understand the reasons behind them.
d. The child is able to judge an act by the intentions that prompted it rather than just by the consequences.

 

 

ANS:  D

Older school-age children are able to judge an act by the intentions that prompted the behavior rather than just by the consequences. Rule violation is likely to be viewed in relation to the total context in which it appears. Rules and judgments become less absolute and authoritarian. The situation and the morality of the rule itself influence reactions.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 650

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. An 8-year-old girl tells the nurse that she has cancer because God is punishing her for “being bad.” The nurse should interpret this as being which of the following?
a. A common belief at this age
b. Indicative of excessive family pressure
c. Faith that forms the basis for most religions
d. Suggestive of a failure to develop a conscience

 

 

ANS:  A

Children at this age may view illness or injury as a punishment for a real or imagined misbehavior. School-age children expect to be punished and tend to choose a punishment that they think “fits the crime.” This is a common belief and not related to excessive family pressure. Many faiths do not include a God that causes cancer in response for “bad” behavior. This statement reflects the child’s belief in what is right and wrong.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 650

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. What is the role of the peer group in the life of school-age children?
a. Decreases their need to learn appropriate sex roles
b. Gives them an opportunity to learn dominance and hostility
c. Allows them to remain dependent on their parents for a longer time
d. Provides them with security as they gain independence from their parents

 

 

ANS:  D

Peer-group identification is an important factor in gaining independence from parents. Through peer relationships, children learn ways to deal with dominance and hostility. They also learn how to relate to people in positions of leadership and authority and how to explore ideas and the physical environment. A child’s concept of appropriate sex roles is influenced by relationship with peers.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 651

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following is descriptive of the social development of school-age children?
a. Identification with peers is minimum.
b. Children frequently have “best friends.”
c. Boys and girls play equally with each other.
d. Peer approval is not yet an influence for the child to conform.

 

 

ANS:  B

Identification with peers is a strong influence in children’s gaining independence from parents. Interaction among peers leads to the formation of close friendships with same-sex peers—“best friends.” Daily relationships with age-mates in the school setting provide important social interaction for school-age children. During later school years, groups are composed predominantly of children of the same sex. Conforming to the rules of the peer group provides children with a sense of security and relieves them of the responsibility of making decisions.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 652

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following statements best describes the relationship school-age children have with their families?
a. Ready to reject parental controls
b. Desire to spend equal time with family and peers
c. Need and want restrictions placed on their behavior by the family
d. Peer group replaces the family as the primary influence in setting standards of behavior and rules

 

 

ANS:  C

School-age children need and want restrictions placed on their behavior, and they are not prepared to cope with all the problems of their expanding environment. Although increased independence is the goal of middle childhood, they feel more secure knowing that an authority figure can implement controls and restriction. In the middle-school years, children prefer peer-group activities to family activities and want to spend more time in the company of peers. Family values usually take precedence over peer value systems.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 653

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. A parent asks about whether a 7-year-old is able to care for a dog. Based on the child’s age, the nurse suggests:
a. caring for an animal requires more maturity than the average 7-year-old possesses.
b. this will help the parent identify the child’s weaknesses.
c. a dog can help the child develop confidence and emotional health.
d. cats are better pets for school-age children.

 

 

ANS:  C

Pets have been observed to influence a child’s self-esteem. They can have a positive effect on physical and emotional health and can teach children the importance of nurturing and nonverbal communication. Most 7-year-olds are capable of caring for a pet with supervision. Caring for a pet should be a positive experience. It should not be used to identify weaknesses. The pet chosen does not matter as much as the child’s being responsible for a pet.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 654

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The school nurse has been asked to begin teaching sex education in the fifth grade. The nurse should recognize that:
a. questions need to be discouraged in this setting.
b. most children in the fifth grade are too young for sex education.
c. sexuality is presented as a normal part of growth and development.
d. correct terminology should be reserved for children who are older.

 

 

ANS:  C

When sexual information is presented to school-age children, sex should be treated as a normal part of growth and development. They should be encouraged to ask questions. At 10 to 11 years old, fifth graders are not too young to speak about physiologic changes in their bodies. Preadolescents need precise and concrete information.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 655

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following is descriptive of the play of school-age children?
a. They like to invent games, making up the rules as they go.
b. Individuality in play is better tolerated than at earlier ages.
c. Knowing the rules of a game gives an important sense of belonging.
d. Team play helps children learn the universal importance of competition and winning.

 

 

ANS:  C

Play involves increased physical skill, intellectual ability, and fantasy. Children form groups and cliques and develop a sense of belonging to a team or club. At this age, children begin to see the need for rules. Conformity and ritual permeate their play. Their games have fixed and unvarying rules, which may be bizarre and extraordinarily rigid. With team play, children learn about competition and the importance of winning, an attribute highly valued in the United States but not in all cultures.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 656

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The school nurse is providing guidance to families of children who are entering elementary school. Essential information to include is:
a. meet with teachers only at scheduled conferences.
b. encourage growth of a sense of responsibility in children.
c. provide tutoring for child to ensure mastery of material.
d. homework should be done as soon as child comes home from school.

 

 

ANS:  B

By being responsible for school work, children learn to keep promises, meet deadlines, and succeed in their jobs as adults. Parents should meet with the teachers at the beginning of the school year, scheduled conferences, and whenever information about the child or parental concerns need to be shared. Tutoring should be provided only in special circumstances in elementary school, such as in response to prolonged absence. The parent should not dictate the study time, but establish guidelines to ensure that homework is done.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 660

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following is characteristic of dishonest behavior in children ages 8 to 10 years?
a. Cheating during games is now more common.
b. Stealing can occur because their sense of property rights is limited.
c. Lying is used to meet expectations set by others that they have been unable to attain.
d. Dishonesty results from the inability to distinguish between fact and fantasy.

 

 

ANS:  C

Older school-age children may lie to meet expectations set by others to which they have been unable to measure up. Cheating usually becomes less frequent as the child matures. Young children may lack a sense of property rights; older children may steal to supplement an inadequate allowance, or it may be an indication of serious problems. In this age-group, children are able to distinguish between fact and fantasy.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 661

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. A 9-year-old girl often comes to the school nurse complaining of stomach pains. Her teacher says she is completing her school work satisfactorily, but lately has been somewhat aggressive and stubborn in the classroom. The school nurse should recognize this as which of the following?
a. Signs of stress
b. Developmental delay
c. Lack of adjustment to school environment
d. Physical problem that needs medical intervention

 

 

ANS:  A

Signs of stress include stomach pains or headache, sleep problems, bed-wetting, changes in eating habits, aggressive or stubborn behavior, reluctance to participate, or regression to earlier behaviors. The child is completing school work satisfactorily; any developmental delay would have been diagnosed earlier. The teacher reports that this is a departure from the child’s normal behavior. Adjustment issues would most likely be evident soon after a change. Medical intervention is not immediately required. Recognizing that this constellation of symptoms can indicate stress, the nurse should help the child identify sources of stress and how to use stress reduction techniques. The parents are involved in the evaluation process.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 664

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity

 

  1. Which one of the following statements best describes fear in the school-age child?
a. Increasing concerns about bodily safety overwhelm them.
b. They should be encouraged to hide their fears to prevent ridicule by peers.
c. Most of the new fears that trouble them are related to school and family.
d. Children with numerous fears need continuous protective behavior by parents to eliminate these fears.

 

 

ANS:  C

During the school-age years, children experience a wide variety of fears, but new fears related predominantly to school and family bother children during this time. Parents and other persons involved with children should discuss children’s fear with them individually or as a group activity. Sometimes school-age children hide their fears to avoid being teased. Hiding the fears does not end them and may lead to phobias.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 664

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. A school-age child has begun to sleepwalk. The nurse advises the parents to:
a. wake the child and help determine what is wrong.
b. leave the child alone unless he or she is in danger of harming self or others.
c. arrange for psychologic evaluation to identify the cause of stress.
d. keep the child awake later in the evening to ensure sufficient tiredness for a full night of sleep.

 

 

ANS:  B

Sleepwalking is usually self-limiting and requires no treatment. The child usually moves about restlessly and then returns to bed. Usually the actions are repetitive and clumsy. The child should not be awakened unless in danger. If there is a need to awaken the child, it should be done by calling the child’s name to gradually bring to a state of alertness. Some children, who are usually well behaved and tend to repress feelings, may sleepwalk due to strong emotions. These children usually respond to relaxation techniques before bedtime. If a child is overly fatigued, sleepwalking can increase.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 668

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Physiological Integrity: Basic Care and Comfort

 

  1. The school nurse is discussing after-school sports participation with parents of children age 10 years. The nurse’s presentation includes which of the following important considerations?
a. Teams should be gender specific.
b. Organized sports are not appropriate at this age.
c. Competition is detrimental to the establishment of a positive self-image.
d. Sports participation is encouraged if the type of sport is appropriate to the child’s abilities.

 

 

ANS:  D

Virtually every child is suited for some type of sport. The child should be matched to the type of sport appropriate to his or her abilities and physical and emotional makeup. At this age, girls and boys have the same basic structure and similar responses to exercise and training. After puberty, teams should be gender specific because of the increased muscle mass in boys. Organized sports help the child learn teamwork and skill acquisition. The emphasis should be on playing and learning. Children do enjoy appropriate levels of competition.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 669

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Nursing interventions to promote health during middle childhood include which of the following?
a. Stress the need for increased calorie intake to meet increased demands.
b. Instruct parents to defer questions about sex until the child reaches adolescence.
c. Advise parents that the child will need increasing amounts of rest toward the end of this period.
d. Educate parents about the need for good dental hygiene, since these are the years in which permanent teeth erupt.

 

 

ANS:  D

The permanent teeth erupt during the school-age years. Good dental hygiene and regular attention to dental caries are vital parts of health supervision during this period. Caloric needs are decreased in relation to body size for this age-group. Balanced nutrition is essential to promote growth. Questions about sex should be addressed honestly as the child asks questions. The child usually no longer needs a nap, but most require approximately 11 hours of sleep each night at age 5 and 9 hours at age 12.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 671

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. When a child requires medication in school, authorization is required from:
a. parents.
b. pharmacist.
c. school administrators.
d. prescribing practitioner.

 

 

ANS:  A

A child who requires medication during the school day requires written authorization from the parent or guardian. Most schools also require that the medication be in the original container appropriately labeled by the pharmacist or physician. Some schools allow children to receive over-the-counter medications with parental permission. The pharmacist may be asked to appropriately label the medication for use at the school, but authorization is not required. The school administration should have a policy in place that facilitates the administration of medications for children who need them. The prescribing practitioner is responsible for the ensuring that the medication is appropriate for the child. Since the child is a minor, parental consent is required.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 674

TOP:   Nursing Process: Implementation

MSC:  Client Needs: Physiological Integrity: Pharmacological and Parenteral Therapies

 

  1. Which of the following is an important consideration in preventing injuries during middle childhood?
a. Achieving social acceptance is a primary objective.
b. Incidence of injuries in girls is significantly higher than it is in boys.
c. Injuries from burns are the highest at this age because of fascination with fire.
d. Lack of muscular coordination and control results in an increased incidence of injuries.

 

 

ANS:  A

School-age children often participate in dangerous activities in an attempt to prove themselves worthy of acceptance. The incidence of injury during middle childhood is significantly higher in boys compared with girls. Motor vehicle collisions are the most common cause of severe injuries in children. The child has increasing muscular coordination. Those children who are risk takers may have inadequate self-regulatory behavior.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 676

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. When teaching injury prevention during the school-age years, the nurse should include which of the following?
a. Teach child about need to fear strangers.
b. Teach basic rules of water safety.
c. Avoid letting child cook in microwave ovens.
d. Caution child against engaging in competitive sports.

 

 

ANS:  B

Water safety instruction is an important component of injury prevention at this age. The child should be taught to swim, select safe and supervised places to swim, swim with a companion, check sufficient water depth for diving, and use an approved flotation device. Teach stranger safety, not fear of strangers. This includes telling the child not to go with strangers, not to wear personalized clothing in public places, to tell parents if anyone makes child feel uncomfortable, and to say no in uncomfortable situations. Teach the child safe cooking. Caution against engaging in dangerous sports such as jumping on trampolines.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 675

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. Which of the following is an important consideration for the school nurse who is planning a class on bicycle safety?
a. Most bicycle injuries involve collision with an automobile.
b. Head injuries are the major causes of bicycle-related fatalities.
c. Children should wear a bicycle helmet if they ride on paved streets.
d. Children should not ride double unless the bicycle has an extra large seat.

 

 

ANS:  B

The most important aspect of bicycle safety is to encourage the rider to use a protective helmet. Head injuries are the major cause of bicycle-related fatalities. Although motor vehicle collisions do cause injuries to bicyclists, most injuries result from falls. The child should always wear a properly fitted helmet approved by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. Children should not ride double unless it is a tandem bike (built for two).

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 677

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children under the age of 16 years be prohibited from participating in:
a. skateboarding.
b. snowmobiling.
c. trampoline use.
d. horseback riding.

 

 

ANS:  B

The American Academy of Pediatrics views the use of snowmobiles and all-terrain vehicles as major health hazards for children. This group opposes the use of these vehicles by children less than 16 years of age. The academy recommends that children under the age of 10 not use skateboards without parental supervision. Protective gear is always suggested. Trampoline use has increased along with injuries. Adults should supervise use. Horseback riding injuries are a source of concern. Parents should determine the instructor’s safety record with students.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Comprehension   REF:   p. 679

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The nurse is developing a teaching pamphlet for parents of school-age children. Which of the following anticipatory guidelines should the nurse include in the pamphlet?
a. At age 6, parents should be certain that the child is reading independently with books provided by school.
b. At age 8, parents should expect a decrease in involvement with peers and outside activities.
c. At age 10, parents should expect a decrease in admiration of the parents with little interest in parent-child activities.
d. At age 12, parents should be certain that the child’s sex education is adequate with accurate information.

 

 

ANS:  D

A 12-year-old child should have been introduced to sex education and parents should be certain that the information is adequate and accurate and that the child is not embarrassed to talk about sexual feelings or other aspects of sex education. At age 6, a child does not need to be reading independently and usually still needs help with reading and enjoys being read to. At 8 years of age parents should expect their child to show increased involvement with peers and outside activities and should encourage this behavior. A 10-year-old exhibits increased feelings of admiration of parents, especially fathers, and parent-child activities should be encouraged.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 680

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

 

  1. The nurse is teaching a class on nutrition to a group of parents of 10- and 11-year-old children. Which of the following statements by one of the parents would indicate a correct understanding of the teaching?
a. “My child does not need to eat a variety of foods, just his favorite food groups.”
b. “My child can add salt and sugar to foods to make them taste better.”
c. “I will serve foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol.”
d. “I will continue to serve red meat three times per week for extra iron.”

 

 

ANS:  C

School-age children should be eating foods that are low in saturated fat and cholesterol in order to prevent long-term consequences. The child’s diet should include a variety of foods, include moderate amounts of extra salt and sugar, emphasize consumption of lean protein (chicken and pork), and limit red meat.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 667

TOP:   Integrated Process: Teaching/Learning

MSC:  Client Needs: Physiological Integrity: Basic Care and Comfort

 

MULTIPLE RESPONSE

 

  1. Which of the following growth and development milestones are expected between the ages of 8 and 9? Select all that apply.
a. Can help with routine household tasks
b. Likes the reward system for accomplished tasks
c. Uses the telephone for practical purposes
d. Chooses friends more selectively
e. Goes about home and community freely, alone or with friends
f. Enjoys family time and is respectful of parents

 

 

ANS:  A, B, E

Children between the age of 8 and 9 accomplish many growth and development milestones, including helping with routine household tasks, liking the reward system when a task is accomplished well, and going out with friends or alone more independently and freely. Using the telephone for practical reasons, choosing friends more selectively, and finding enjoyment in family with new-found respect for parents are tasks accomplished between the ages of 10 and 12.

 

DIF:    Cognitive Level: Application          REF:   p. 659

TOP:   Nursing Process: Assessment          MSC:  Client Needs: Health Promotion and Maintenance

Wong’s Nursing Care of Infants and Children Study Aid 9th Edition Test Bank – Hockenberry

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