Test Bank 10th-Ed Advanced Accounting by Fischer -paul m

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Test Bank 10th-Ed Advanced Accounting by Fischer -paul m

Sample Chapter No 1                                       

Chapter 1—Business Combinations: New Rules for a Long-Standing Business Practice

 

MULTIPLE CHOICE

 

  1. An economic advantage of a business combination includes
a. Utilizing duplicative assets.
b. Creating separate management teams.
c. Coordinated marketing campaigns.
d. Horizontally combining levels within the marketing chain.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    E                    OBJ:   1-1

 

  1. A tax advantage of business combination can occur when the existing owner of a company sells out and receives:
a. cash to defer the taxable gain as a “tax-free reorganization.”
b. stock to defer the taxable gain as a “tax-free reorganization.”
c. cash to create a taxable gain.
d. stock to create a taxable gain.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    E                    OBJ:   1-1

 

  1. A controlling interest in a company implies that the parent company
a. owns all of the subsidiary’s stock.
b. has acquired a majority of the subsidiary’s common stock.
c. has paid cash for a majority of the subsidiary’s stock.
d. has transferred common stock for a majority of the subsidiary’s outstanding bonds and debentures.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-2

 

  1. Company B acquired the net assets of Company S in exchange for cash. The acquisition price exceeds the fair value of the net assets acquired. How should Company B determine the amounts to be reported for the plant and equipment, and for long-term debt of the acquired Company S?

 

Plant and Equipment           Long-Term Debt

a. Fair value                    S’s carrying amount
b. Fair value                    Fair value
c. S’s carrying amount           Fair value
d. S’s carrying amount           S’s carrying amount

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    E                    OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Publics Company acquired the net assets of Citizen Company during 20X5. The purchase price was $800,000. On the date of the transaction, Citizen had no long-term investments in marketable equity securities and $400,000 in liabilities. The fair value of Citizen assets on the acquisition date was as follows:

 

Current assets $   800,000
Noncurrent assets      600,000
$1,400,000

 

How should Publics account for the $200,000 difference between the fair value of the net assets acquired, $1,000,000, and the cost, $800,000?

a. Retained earnings should be reduced by $200,000.
b. Current assets should be recorded at $685,000 and noncurrent assets recorded at $515,000.
c. A $200,000 gain on acquisition of business should be recognized
d. A deferred credit of $200,000 should be set up and subsequently amortized to future net income over a period not to exceed 40 years.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. ABC Co. is acquiring XYZ Inc. XYZ has the following intangible assets:

 

Patent on a product that is deemed to have no useful life $10,000.
Customer list with an observable fair value of $50,000.
A 5-year operating lease with favorable terms with a discounted present value of $8,000.
Identifiable R & D of $100,000.

 

ABC will record how much for acquired Intangible Assets from the purchase of XYZ Inc?

a. $168,000
b. $58,000
c. $158,000
d. $150,000

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    D                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Vibe Company purchased the net assets of Atlantic Company in a business combination accounted for as a purchase. As a result, goodwill was recorded. For tax purposes, this combination was considered to be a tax-free merger. Included in the assets is a building with an appraised value of $210,000 on the date of the business combination. This asset had a net book value of $70,000, based on the use of accelerated depreciation for accounting purposes. The building had an adjusted tax basis to Atlantic (and to Vibe as a result of the merger) of $120,000. Assuming a 36% income tax rate, at what amount should Vibe record this building on its books after the purchase?
a. $120,000
b. $134,400
c. $140,000
d. $210,000

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Goodwill represents the excess cost of an acquisition over the
a. sum of the fair values assigned to intangible assets less liabilities assumed.
b. sum of the fair values assigned to tangible and identifiable intangible assets acquired less liabilities assumed.
c. sum of the fair values assigned to intangibles acquired less liabilities assumed.
d. book value of an acquired company.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. When an acquisition of another company occurs, FASB recommends disclosing all of the following EXCEPT:
a. goodwill assigned to each reportable segment.
b. information concerning contingent consideration including a description of the arrangements and the range of outcomes
c. results of operations for the current period if both companies had remained separate.
d. A qualitative description of factors that make up the goodwill recognized

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-6

  1. Cozzi Company is being purchased and has the following balance sheet as of the purchase date:

 

Current assets $200,000 Liabilities $  90,000
Fixed assets   180,000 Equity   290,000
     Total $380,000      Total $380,000

 

The price paid for Cozzi’s net assets is $500,000. The fixed assets have a fair value of $220,000, and the liabilities have a fair value of $110,000. The amount of goodwill to be recorded in the purchase is ____.

a. $0
b. $150,000
c. $170,000
d. $190,000

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Separately identified intangible assets are accounted for by amortizing:
a. exclusively by using impairment testing.
b. based upon a pattern that reflects the benefits conveyed by the asset.
c. over the useful economic life less residual value using only the straight-line method.
d. over a period not to exceed a maximum of 40 years.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    E                    OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. While performing a goodwill impairment test, the company had the following information:

 

Estimated implied fair value of reporting unit (without goodwill) $420,000
Existing net book value of reporting unit (without goodwill) $380,000
Book value of goodwill $  60,000

 

Based upon this information the proper conclusion is:

a. The existing net book value plus goodwill is in excess of the implied fair value, therefore, no adjustment is required.
b. The existing net book value plus goodwill is less than the implied fair value plus goodwill, therefore, no adjustment is required.
c. The existing net book value plus goodwill is in excess of the implied fair value, therefore, goodwill needs to be decreased.
d. The existing net book value is less than the estimated implied fair value; therefore, goodwill needs to be decreased.

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    D                   OBJ:   1-7

 

  1. Balter Inc. acquired Jersey Company on January 1, 20X5. When the purchase occurred Jersey Company had the following information related to fixed assets:

 

Land $  80,000
Building 200,000
Accumulated Depreciation (100,000)
Equipment 100,000
Accumulated Depreciation (50,000)

 

The building has a 10-year remaining useful life and the equipment has a 5-year remaining useful life. The fair value of the assets on that date were:

Land $100,000
Building 130,000
Equipment 75,000

 

What is the 20X5 depreciation expense Balter will record related to purchasing Jersey Company?

a. $8,000
b. $15,000
c. $28,000
d. $30,000

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. In performing  impairment test for goodwill, the company had the following 20X6 and 20X7 information available.

 

20X6 20X7
Fair value of the reporting unit $350,000 $400,000
Net book value (including $50,000 goodwill) $360,000 $380,000

 

Assume that the carry value of the identifiable assets are a reasonable approximation of their fair values. Based upon this information what are the 20X6 and 20X7 adjustment to goodwill, if any?

20X6                    20X7

a. no adjustment          $20,000 decrease
b. $10,000 increase       $20,000 decrease
c. $10,000 decrease       $20,000 decrease
d. $10,000 decrease       no adjustment

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    D                   OBJ:   1-7

 

ACME Co. paid $110,000 for the net assets of Comb Corp. At the time of the acquisition the following information was available related to Comb’s balance sheet:

 

Book Value Fair Value
Current Assets $50,000 $  50,000
Building 80,000 100,000
Equipment 40,000 50,000
Liabilities 30,000 30,000

 

 

  1. Refer to ACME Co. and Comb Corp. What is the amount recorded by ACME for the Building?
a. $110,000
b. $20,000
c. $80,000
d. $100,000

 

 

ANS:  D                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-7

 

  1. Refer to ACME Co. and Comb Corp. What amount of gain (loss) on disposal of a business should Comb Corp. recognize?
a. Gain of $30,000
b. Gain of $60,000
c. Loss of $30,000
d. Loss of $60,000

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-1

 

  1. Polk issues common stock to acquire all the assets of the Sam Company on January 1, 20X5. There is a contingent share agreement, which states that if the income of the Sam Division exceeds a certain level during 20X5 and 20X6, additional shares will be issued on January 1, 20X7. The impact of issuing the additional shares is to

 

a. increase the price assigned to fixed assets.
b. have no effect on asset values, but to reassign the amounts assigned to equity accounts.
c. reduce retained earnings.
d. record additional goodwill.

 

 

ANS:  B                    DIF:    D                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Orbit Inc. purchased Planet Co. in 20X3. At that time an existing patent was not recorded as a separately identified intangible asset. At the end of fiscal year 20X4, the patent is valued at $15,000, and goodwill has a book value of $100,000. How should intangible assets be reported at the beginning of fiscal year 20X5?

 

a. Goodwill $100,000       Patent $0
b. Goodwill $115,000       Patent $0
c. Goodwill $100,000       Patent $15,000
d. Goodwill $85,000         Patent $15,000

 

 

ANS:  A                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Which of the following income factors should not be factored into an estimation of goodwill?

 

a. sales for the period
b. income tax expense
c. extraordinary items
d. cost of goods sold

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-8 | Appendix A

 

  1. Acquisition costs such as the fees of accountants and lawyers that were necessary to negotiate and consummate the purchase are

 

a. recorded as a deferred asset and amortized over a period not to exceed 15 years
b. expensed if immaterial but capitalized and amortized if over 2% of the acquisition price
c. expensed in the period of the purchase
d. included as part of the price paid for the company purchased

 

 

ANS:  C                    DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 


PROBLEM

 

  1. Internet Corporation is considering the acquisition of Homepage Corporation and has obtained the following audited condensed balance sheet:

 

Homepage Corporation

Balance Sheet

December 31, 20X5

Assets Liabilities and Equity
Current assets $  40,000 Current Liabilities $  60,000
Land 20,000 Capital Stock (50,000
Buildings (net) 80,000      shares, $1 par value) 50,000
Equipment (net) 60,000 Other Paid-in Capital 20,000
               Retained Earnings     70,000
$200,000 $200,000

 

Internet also acquired the following fair values for Homepage’s assets and liabilities:

 

Current assets $  55,000
Land 60,000
Buildings (net) 90,000
Equipment (net) 75,000
Current Liabilities    (60,000)
$220,000

 

Internet and Homepage agree on a price of $280,000 for Homepage’s net assets. Prepare the necessary journal entry to record the purchase given the following scenarios:

 

a. Internet pays cash for Homepage Corporation and incurs $5,000 of acquisition costs.
b. Internet issues its $5 par value stock as consideration. The fair value of the stock at the acquisition date is $50 per share. Additionally, Internet incurs $5,000 of security issuance costs.

 

 

ANS:

Debit Credit
a. Current assets 55,000
Land 60,000
Buildings 90,000
Equipment 75,000
Goodwill 60,000
Acquisition expense 5,000
     Current Liabilities 60,000
     Cash 285,000

 

Debit Credit
b. Current assets 55,000
Land 60,000
Buildings 90,000
Equipment 75,000
Goodwill 60,000
     Current Liabilities 60,000
     Common Stock 28,000
     Other Paid-in Capital 252,000
Acquisition expense 5,000
     Cash 5,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-5

 

  1. On January 1, 20X5, Brown Inc. acquired Larson Company’s net assets in exchange for Brown’s common stock with a par value of $100,000 and a fair value of $800,000. Brown also paid $10,000 in direct acquisition costs and $15,000 in stock issuance costs.

 

On this date, Larson’s condensed account balances showed the following:

 

Book Value Fair Value
Current Assets $280,000 $370,000
Plant and Equipment 440,000 480,000
Accumulated Depreciation (100,000)
Intangibles – Patents 80,000 120,000
Current Liabilities (140,000) (140,000)
Long-Term Debt (100,000) (110,000)
Common Stock (200,000)
Other Paid-in Capital (120,000)
Retained Earnings (140,000)

 

Required:

 

Record Brown’s purchase of Larson Company’s net assets.

 

ANS:

Debit Credit
Current Assets $370,000
Plant and Equipment 480,000
Intangibles – Patents 120,000
Intangibles – Goodwill 80,000
     Current Liabilities $140,000
     Long-term Debt 110,000
     Common Stock 100,000
     Other Paid-in Capital 700,000
Acquisition expenses* 25,000
     Cash 25,000

*alternative treatment: debit Paid-In Capital for issue costs

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-3 | 1-11 | 1-12 | Appendix B

 

  1. The Chan Corporation purchased the net assets (existing liabilities were assumed) of the Don Company for $900,000 cash. The balance sheet for the Don Company on the date of acquisition showed the following:

 

Assets
Current assets $100,000
Equipment 300,000
Accumulated depreciation (100,000)
Plant 600,000
Accumulated depreciation  (250,000)
Total $650,000
Liabilities and Equity
Bonds payable, 8% $200,000
Common stock, $1 par 100,000
Paid-in capital in excess of par 200,000
Retained earnings   150,000
Total $650,000

 

Required:

 

The equipment has a fair value of $300,000, and the plant assets have a fair value of $500,000. Assume that the Chan Corporation has an effective tax rate of 40%. Prepare the entry to record the purchase of the Don Company for each of the following separate cases with specific added information:

 

a. The sale is a nontaxable exchange to the seller that limits the buyer to depreciation and amortization on only book value for tax purposes.
b. The bonds have a current fair value of $190,000. The transaction is a taxable exchange.
c. There are $100,000 of prior-year losses that can be used to claim a tax refund. The transaction is a taxable exchange.
d. There are $150,000 of past losses that can be carried forward to future years to offset taxes that will be due. The transaction is a nontaxable exchange.

 

 

ANS:

a. Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 300,000
Plant 500,000
Goodwill 300,000
     Deferred Tax Liability* 100,000
     Bonds Payable 200,000
     Cash 900,000
* .4 ´ ($800,000 Fair Value  $550,000 Book Value of fixed assets)

 

b. Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 300,000
Plant 500,000
Goodwill 190,000
     Bonds Payable 190,000
     Cash 900,000

 

c. Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 300,000
Plant 500,000
Tax Refund Receivable 40,000
Goodwill 160,000
     Bonds Payable 200,000
     Cash 900,000

 

d. Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 300,000
Plant 500,000
Deferred Tax Expense ($150,000 ´ .4) 60,000
Goodwill 240,000
     Bonds Payable 200,000
     Cash 900,000
     Deferred Tax Liability

($250,000 ´ .4)

 

100,000

 

 

DIF:    D                    OBJ:   1-8

 

  1. On January 1, 20X5, Zebb and Nottle Companies had condensed balance sheets as shown below:

 

Zebb Nottle
Company Company
Current Assets $1,000,000 $   600,000
Plant and Equipment   1,500,000      800,000
$2,500,000 $1,400,000
Current Liabilities $   200,000 $   100,000
Long-Term Debt 300,000 300,000
Common Stock, $10 par 1,400,000 400,000
Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par 0 100,000
Retained Earnings      600,000      500,000
$2,500,000 $1,400,000

 

Required:

 

Record the acquisition of Nottle’s net assets, the issuance of the stock and/or payment of cash, and payment of the related costs. Assume that Zebb issued 30,000 shares of new common stock with a fair value of $25 per share and paid $500,000 cash for all of the net assets of Nottle. Acquisition costs of $50,000 and stock issuance costs of $20,000 were paid in cash. Current assets had a fair value of $650,000, plant and equipment had a fair value of $900,000, and long-term debt had a fair value of $330,000.

 

ANS:

Current Assets 650,000
Plant and Equipment 900,000
Goodwill 130,000
Acquisition expenses* 70,000
     Current Liabilities 100,000
     Long-Term Debt 330,000
     Common Stock 300,000
     Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par 450,000
     Cash ($500,000 + 70,000) 570,000

*alternative treatment: debit Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par for issue costs

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-5

  1. On January 1, 20X1, Honey Bee Corporation purchased the net assets of Green Hornet Company for $1,500,000. On this date, a condensed balance sheet for Green Hornet showed:

 

Book Fair
Value Value
Current Assets $   500,000 $800,000
Long-Term Investments in Securities 200,000 150,000
Land 100,000 600,000
Buildings (net)      700,000 900,000
$1,500,000
Current Liabilities $   300,000 $300,000
Long-Term Debt 550,000 600,000
Common Stock (no-par) 300,000
Retained Earnings      350,000
$1,500,000

 

Required:

 

Record the entry on Honey Bee’s books for the acquisition of Green Hornet’s net assets.

 

ANS:

Current Assets 800,000
Long-Term Investments in Securities 150,000
Land 600,000
Building 900,000
     Current Liabilities 300,000
     Long-Term Debt 600,000
     Gain on acquisition of business 50,000
     Cash 1,500,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

  1. Poplar Corp. acquires the net assets of Sapling Company, which has the following balance sheet:

 

Accounts Receivable $  50,000
Inventory 80,000
Equipment, Net 50,000
Land & Building, Net   120,000
Total Assets $300,000
Bonds Payable $  90,000
Common Stock 100,000
Retained Earnings   110,000
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $300,000

 

Fair values on the date of acquisition:

 

Accounts Receivable $  50,000
Inventory 100,000
Equipment 30,000
Land & Building 180,000
Customer List 30,000
Bonds Payable 100,000
Acquisition costs: $  10,000

 

If Poplar paid $300,000 what journal entries would be recorded by both Poplar Corp. and Sapling Company?

 

ANS:

Poplar Corp:

Accounts Receivable   50,000
Inventory 100,000
Equipment 30,000
Land & Building 180,000
Customer List 30,000
Goodwill* 10,000
Acquisition expenses 10,000
     Bonds Payable   90,000
     Premium on Bonds Payable 10,000
     Cash ($300,000 + $10,000) 310,000
*Goodwill: Price paid $300,000 – Fair value of net identifiable assets $290,000 = $10,000

 

Sapling Company:

Cash 300,000
Bonds Payable 90,000
     Accounts Receivable   50,000
     Inventory 80,000
     Equipment 50,000
     Land & Building, net 120,000
     Gain on Sale of Business 90,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-3

 

  1. Diamond acquired Heart’s net assets. At the time of the acquisition Heart’s Balance sheet was as follows:

 

Accounts Receivable $130,000
Inventory 70,000
Equipment, Net 50,000
Building, Net 250,000
Land & Building, Net   100,000
Total Assets $600,000
Bonds Payable $100,000
Common Stock 50,000
Retained Earnings   450,000
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity $600,000

 

Fair values on the date of acquisition:

 

Inventory $100,000
Equipment 30,000
Building 350,000
Land 120,000
Brand name copyright 50,000
Bonds payable 120,000
Acquisition costs: $    5,000

 

Required:

 

Record the entry for the purchase of the net assets of Heart by Diamond at the following cash prices:

 

a. $700,000
b. $300,000

 

 

ANS:

a. Accounts Receivable 130,000
Inventory 100,000
Equipment 30,000
Building 350,000
Land 120,000
Brand Name 50,000
Goodwill 40,000
Acquisition expenses 5,000
     Bonds Payable 100,000
     Premium on Bonds Payable 20,000
     Cash ($700,000 + $5,000) 705,000

 

b. Accounts Receivable 130,000
Inventory 100,000
Equipment 30,000
Building 350,000
Land 120,000
Brand Name 50,000
Acquisition expenses 5,000
     Bonds Payable 100,000
     Premium on Bonds Payable 20,000
     Gain on acquisition of business 360,000
     Cash ($300,000 + $5,000) 305,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-5 | 1-7

 

  1. On January 1, July 1, and December 31, 20X5, a condensed trial balance for Nelson Company showed the following debits and (credits):
01/01/X5 06/30/X5 12/31/X5
Current Assets $200,000 $260,000 $340,000
Plant and Equipment (net) 500,000 510,000 510,000
Current Liabilities (50,000) (70,000) (60,000)
Long-Term Debt (100,000) (100,000) (100,000)
Common Stock (150,000) (150,000) (150,000)
Other Paid-in Capital (100,000) (100,000) (100,000)
Retained Earnings, January 1 (300,000) (300,000) (300,000)
Dividends Declared 10,000
Revenues (400,000) (900,000)
Expenses 350,000 750,000

Assume that, on July 1, 20X5, Systems Corporation purchased the net assets of Nelson Company for $750,000 in cash. On this date, the fair values for certain net assets were:

 

Current Assets $280,000
Plant and Equipment (remaining life of 10 years) 600,000

 

Nelson Company’s books were NOT closed on June 30, 20X5.

 

For all of 20X5, Systems’ revenues and expenses were $1,500,000 and $1,200,000, respectively.

 

Required:

(1) Record the entry on Systems’ books for the July 1, 20X5 purchase of Nelson.

 

 

ANS:

1. Debit Credit
Current Assets 280,000
Plant and Equipment 600,000
Goodwill 40,000
     Current Liabilities   70,000
     Long-Term Debt 100,000
     Cash 750,000

 

 

DIF:    D                    OBJ:   1-5

 

  1. Mans Company is about to purchase the net assets of Eagle Incorporated, which has the following balance sheet:

 

Assets
Accounts receivable $  60,000
Inventory 100,000
Equipment $  90,000
Accumulated depreciation   (50,000) 40,000
Land and buildings $300,000
Accumulated depreciation (100,000) 200,000
Goodwill     60,000
     Total assets $460,000
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
Bonds payable $  80,000
Common stock, $10 par 200,000
Paid-in capital in excess of par 100,000
Retained earnings     80,000
     Total liabilities and equity $460,000

 

Mans has secured the following fair values of Eagle’s accounts:

 

Inventory $130,000
Equipment 60,000
Land and buildings 260,000
Bonds payable 60,000

 

Acquisition costs were $20,000.

Required:

 

Record the entry for the purchase of the net assets of Eagle by Mans at the following cash prices:

 

a. $450,000
b. $310,000
c. $480,000

 

 

ANS:

NOTE: In all scenarios, the pre-existing goodwill on Mans’ balance sheet is disregarded when measuring the goodwill inherent in Eagle’s purchase transaction.

a. Accounts Receivable   60,000
Inventory 130,000
Equipment 60,000
Land and Buildings 260,000
Discount on Bonds Payable 20,000
Acquisition expenses 20,000
     Bonds Payable   80,000
     Cash (includes acquisition costs) 470,000

 

b. Accounts Receivable   60,000
Inventory 130,000
Equipment 60,000
Land and Buildings 260,000
Discount on Bonds Payable 20,000
Acquisition expenses 20,000
     Gain on acquisition of a business 140,000
     Bonds Payable 80,000
     Cash (includes acquisition costs) 330,000

 

c. Accounts Receivable   60,000
Inventory 130,000
Equipment 60,000
Land and Buildings 260,000
Discount on Bonds Payable 20,000
Acquisition expenses 20,000
Goodwill 30,000
     Bonds Payable   80,000
     Cash (includes acquisition costs) 500,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-5 | 1-7

 

  1. On January 1, 20X1 the fair values of Pink Coral’s net assets were as follows:

 

Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 150,000
Land 50,000
Buildings 300,000
Liabilities 80,000

 

On January 1, 20X1, Blue Reef Company purchased the net assets of the Pink Coral Company by issuing 100,000 shares of its $1 par value stock when the fair value of the stock was $6.20. It was further agreed that Blue Reef would pay an additional amount on January 1, 20X3, if the average income during the 2-year period of 20X1-20X2 exceeded $80,000 per year. The expected value of this consideration was calculated as $184,000; the measurement period is one year.

 

Required: Prepare Blue Reef’s entries:

  1. a) on January 1, 20X1 to record the acquisition
  2. b) on August 1, 20X1 to revise the contingent consideration to $170,000
  3. c) on January 1, 20X3 to settle the contingent consideration clause of the agreement for $175,000

 

ANS:

a. Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 150,000
Land 50,000
Buildings 300,000
Goodwill 284,000
     Liabilities 80,000
     Estimated liability for contingent consideration 184,000
     Common Stock, $1 Par 100,000
     Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par 520,000

 

b. Estimated liability for contingent consideration 14,000
     Goodwill 14,000

 

c. Estimated liability for contingent consideration 170,000
Loss on estimated contingent consideration 5,000
     Cash 175,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-8

 

  1. The Blue Reef Company purchased the net assets of the Pink Coral Company on January 1, 20X1, and made the following entry to record the purchase:

 

Current Assets 100,000
Equipment 150,000
Land 50,000
Buildings 300,000
Goodwill 100,000
     Liabilities 80,000
     Common Stock, $1 Par 100,000
     Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par 520,000

 

Required:

 

Make the required entry on January 1, 20X3, assuming that additional shares would be issued on that date to compensate for any fall in the value of Blue Reef common stock below $16 per share. The settlement would be to cure the deficiency by issuing added shares based on their fair value on January 1, 20X3. The fair price of the shares on January 1, 20X3 was $10.

 

ANS:

Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par 60,000
     Common Stock, $1 par 60,000
Deficiency: ($16 – $10) ´ 100,000 shares issued to acquire $600,000
Divide by $10 fair value  ÷ $10.00
Added number of shares to issue   60,000

 

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-4

 

ESSAY

 

  1. Goodwill is an intangible asset. There are a variety of recommendations about how intangible assets should be included in the financial statements. Discuss the recommendations for proper disclosure of goodwill. Include a comparison with disclosure of other intangible assets.

 

ANS:

Goodwill arises when a company is purchased and the value assigned to identifiable assets, including intangible assets, is in excess of the price paid. As such goodwill represents the value of intangible assets that could not be valued individually.

 

During a purchase some intangible assets such as patents, customer lists, brand names, and favorable lease agreements may exist but have not been recorded. The fair value of these intangible assets should be determined and recorded separate from the value of goodwill associated with the purchase.

 

Intangible assets other than goodwill will be amortized over their economic lives. The amortization method should reflect the pattern of benefits conveyed by the asset, so that a straight-line method is to be used unless another systematic method is appropriate.

 

Intangible assets may be reported individually, in groups, or in the aggregate on the balance sheet after fixed assets and are displayed net of cumulative amortization. Details for current and cumulative amortization, along with significant residual values, are shown in the footnotes to the balance sheet.

 

Goodwill is subject to impairment procedures. These concerns must be addressed related to goodwill:

 

1. Goodwill must be allocated to reporting units if the purchased company contains more than one reporting unit.
2. A reporting unit valuation plan must be established within one year of a purchase. This will be used as the measurement process in future periods.
3. Impairment testing is normally done on an annual basis.
4. The procedure for determining impairment must be established.
5. The procedure for determining the amount of the impairment loss, which is also the decrease in the goodwill amount recorded, must be established.

 

Goodwill is considered impaired when the implied fair value of reporting unit is less than the carrying value of the reporting unit’s net assets. Once goodwill is written down, it cannot be adjusted to a higher amount.

 

Changes to goodwill must be disclosed. The disclosure would include the amount of goodwill acquired, the goodwill impairment losses, and the goodwill written off as part of a disposal of a reporting unit.

 

DIF:    D                    OBJ:   1-4 | 1-5 | 1-6 | 1-9

  1. While acquisitions are often friendly, there are numerous occasions when a party does not want to be acquired. Discuss possible defensive strategies that firms can implement to fend off a hostile takeover attempt.

 

ANS:

GREENMAIL: A strategy is which the target company pays a premium price to purchase treasury shares. The shares purchased are owned by the hostile acquirer or shareholders who might sell to the hostile acquirer.

 

WHITE KNIGHT: A strategy in which the target company locates a different company to take it over, a company that is more likely to keep current management and employees in place.

 

SELLING THE CROWN JEWELS: A strategy in which the target company sells off vital assets in order to make the company less attractive to prospective acquirers.

 

POISON PILL: A strategy in which the target company issues stock rights to existing shareholders at a price far below fair value. The rights are only exercisable if an acquirer makes a bid for the target company. The resulting new shares make the acquisition more expensive.

 

LEVERAGED BUYOUT: A strategy in which the management of the target company attempts to purchase a controlling interest in the target company, in order to continue control of the company.

 

DIF:    M                   OBJ:   1-2

Test Bank 10th-Ed Advanced Accounting by Fischer -paul m

Test Bank 10th-Ed Advanced Accounting by Fischer -paul m